NAVAL VESSELS OF WHATEVER TYPE AND NATIONALITY HAVE ALWAYS BEEN OF INTEREST AND TO COUNTLESS ENTHUSIASTIC PEOPLE MANY AFICIONADO'S.

WHAT FOLLOWS IS FIRSTLY A COMPREHENSIVE LIST OF ROYAL NAVAL SHIPS IN SERVICE [INCLUDING IN ACTIVE RESERVE I.E. NOT MOTH BALLED] IN ALL THE YEARS OF MY NAVAL SERVICE [1953 TO 1983] which is already published separately,  AND SECONDLY A COMPREHENSIVE LIST OF WARSHIPS OF THE WORLD WHO FELL ON HARD TIMES FOR WHATEVER REASON, FROM 1945 T0 1988, AND IN MANY CASES, BELIEVE ME, ITS ALMOST A HORROR STORY. WHAT SHIPS AND MEN WERE NOT DESTROYED OR DAMAGED IN WW2 WERE DESTROYED/DAMAGED AT THE HANDS OF SHEER INCOMPETENCE IN THE MAJORITY OF CASES AND SHEER BAD LUCK, POST WW2!

So first off the story which was written in 1982 at the end of the Falklands War seen here

http://www.godfreydykes.info/navy_and_its_changes_during_my_3.htm

and secondly

this file which above all else was written about executive offcers who are to be seen on the bridge/bridge wings during potentially hazardous times especially RAS[L]'s in the embryonic days of the manoeuvre, at least one could think so, given the sheer number of collisions recorded in the very long list of mishaps, and grotesque death lists, as shown in this

Chronology of Naval Accidents 1945 to 1988.

ITEM 367 Is a sad tale indeed. The ship so Badly damaged in a collision was called the USS AMMEN and 11 men died in her and 20 injured, and given her spoken name and the way we Christians use it meant curtains for the ship 'so be it'.

USS Nautilus (SSN-571) was the world's first operational nuclear-powered submarine and the first submarine to complete a submerged transit of the North Pole on 3 August 1958. It was thus famous world wide. In the 1959/60 period is was well known, at least in navy terms, for fires, arson, breakdowns, collisions etc of which many occurrence are listed.

Item 392 USS CHARR SS-328, brave beyond comparison and deserving of the very highest award possibe

Item 635 was the worst ever RAS[L] collision between two large vessels

In so many ways this list tells the story of the challenges and demands of the cold war which was acted out mainly at sea and between submarine services and I for one was involved from 1959 to 1964 in UK diesel electrics, fighting a cold war already long run by those dates. We got our first nuclear boat the Dreadnought in 1960 and several thereafter and it was they who took up the British challenge from the mid 60's until the cold war ceased. From the mid sixties we conventional submariners acted as support vessels to our big sisters  supporting our nuclear boats for from then on, it became a nuclear war under  the far reaches of the Atlantic and the polar regions.  For a read which includes two of my boats the Turpin and the Auriga, I highly recommend you read this book called Hunter Killers by Iain Ballantyne ISBN 978-1-4091-3901-0.  Iain has won many accolades for his maritime contributions, and quite recently he was awarded the prestigious special recognition from the British Maritime Charitable Foundation for his consistent and unswerving contributions to raising maritime awareness over the years.